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Model UN Conference 2022

Conference Agenda

Registration in the Student Commons
8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast (Hajjar Dining Hall)
8:00 a.m. – 8:55 a.m.

Opening Ceremonies (Cadigan Gym)
9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

Committee Session I
10:10 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Lunch (Hajjar Dining Hall)
12:15 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Committee Session II
1:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Closing Ceremonies (Cadigan Gym)
3:40 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Welcome from the Secretary General

Dear Delegates,

The Boston College High School Model United Nations Club cordially invites you to BC High Model United Nations Conference 30, Saturday, March 5, 2022, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on our campus in Boston, MA. All registration details are below.

BC High Model UN Conference 30 is an in-person conference. All participants must be fully vaccinated for Covid-19. Moderators will submit a verification form stating all delegates and moderators are vaccinated.

Staffed entirely by Boston College High School students, BC High’s Model UN Conference traditionally brings together boys and girls from around New England. Continuing the success of last year’s international conference, we have again extended an invitation to Jesuit high schools in Canada and Ireland.

The conference will simulate the United Nations, and other national or international governing bodies in the past, present, and future. The goal is for delegates to experience and gain insight from the operations of the United Nations, through collaboration to solve global issues.

Participants will work with other high school students representing delegates of a variety of agendas and beliefs, collaboration and discussion to produce a resolution. In the process, delegates gain a better understanding of the issue at hand, while sharpening debate, negotiation, and public speaking skills.

We will look forward to you joining us!

With our joyful greetings from the entire BC High Secretariat,

Nick Trejo ’22
Secretary General
Boston College High School Model United Nations Club

Meet the Officers

2021-22 BC High Model UN Secratariat

BC High MUN 30 General Conference Inquiries
General Conference Questions
Nick Trejo ’22, Secretary General
[email protected]

Contact Information

Committee Preferences/Assignment Questions
Christopher Kerwin ’22, Conference Chair
[email protected]

Invoice/Billing Questions
Alexander Church ’22, Director of External Affairs
[email protected]

Moderator
Dr. Nicholas Argento, Social Studies Department
[email protected]

Committees & Background Guides

Conference Position Paper
Preparing a one to two page double spaced position paper is required for all delegates at the conference. We require this to focus everyone’s attention on the committee topics ahead of time. We have found that preparing these promotes more thoughtful discussion. Do not let this requirement impede your decision to attend this conference. We are only trying to make the discussion better.

  • General Assembly UN Environmental Programme: Illegal Poaching

    General Assembly UN Environmental Programme: Illegal Poaching
    (All levels of experience welcome)

    Despite the international trade ban of ivory in 1990, nearly 30,000 African elephants are killed by poachers annually, out of a mere 400,000 continent-wide elephant population. In the past century, 90% of all African elephants have been poached for their lucrative ivory tusks. Botswana is home to approximately 130,000 African elephants. Botswana issued 70 elephant-hunting licenses in 2020 and plans to issue more licenses. In this committee, delegates must determine whether poaching should be unrestricted, regulated, or terminated and how much power the United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) has in restricting poaching.

    Questions to consider:
    1. What actions can hold countries or organizations responsible for these malicious acts?

    2. How can the UNEP assist governments in their regulations of the current ivory trade?

    3. Can foreign policy and UNEP action resolve tensions and improve relations between these organizations and their home countries?

    4.How can the UNEP enforce illegal poaching in this region? For example will local governments abide by these regulations or secretly continue their licensing for a future profit?

    Click here for background
  • Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) Ethiopian Dam Crisis

    Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) Ethiopian Dam Crisis
    (All levels of experience welcome)

    The Ethiopian Renaissance Dam is an ambitious 2021 project taken on by the Ethiopian government to create more farmland and provide more potable water for its citizens. The dam will more than double Ethiopia’s energy demand through its increased hydro-electric productivity. However, in filling their reservoir, they restrict the flow of the Nile River, decreasing the benefits it provides neighboring Egypt.

    Questions to Consider:
    1. Does Ethiopia have a right to build the dam for their own economic growth?

    2. Do they have a responsibility to not harm their neighbors in Egypt?

    3. Is there a compromise both nations can reach?

    Click here for background
  • African Union: Sudanese War

    African Union: Sudanese War 
    (All levels of experience welcome)

    This committee takes place during the Second Sudanese Civil War, which lasted from 1983 to 2005. The war was caused by decades of ethnic and religious tensions between the primarily Muslim North and the primarily Christian South. In addition, the war caused a massive humanitarian crisis, resulting in at least 4 million people being displaced and an estimated 2 million civilian deaths, due to starvation, disease, and drought.

    Questions:

    1. What actions must be taken to end this grueling war?

    2. How can this devastating humanitarian crisis be resolved?

    3. What long term solution can be implemented to permanently stop the ethnic and religious tension in Sudan.

     

    Click here for Background
  • Office on Genocide and the Responsibility to Protect Prisoners of War: Human Experimentation

    Office on Genocide and the Responsibility to Protect Prisoners of War: Human Experimentation
    (All levels of experience welcome)

    In 1945, Japanese forces captured eight American airmen, and sent them to a medical clinic in Fukuoka. Believed to have received medical care there, it came to light that instead, the prisoners of war were subjected to vivisection, such as determining whether seawater was an adequate substitute for saline solutions. Experimentation on prisoners has been a common practice by many nations, with most known instances being in WWII.

    1. Are there universal rights granted to prisoners of war? Do nations have an obligation to intervene if they are violated?

    2. How can reparations be made to the countries or families of soldiers subject to experimentation?

    Click here for background
  • Boston City Council: The flooding of Boston 2075, A Forecast by NOAA

    Boston City Council: The flooding of Boston 2075, A Forecast by NOAA
    (All levels of experience welcome)

    Global warming and climate change have been major global issues for years and continue to become more and more pressing. These issues are causing temperature and ocean levels to rise at an alarming rate. This damage is the result of ongoing pollution, litter, and heavy reliance on non-renewable resources. If the rate at which these issues are increasing continues, Boston will be covered with 44 feet of water by 2075.

    Questions to consider:
    1.  What action could the UN take to limit the use of non-renewable resources?

    2.  How can the UN quickly implement a sufficient plan in a short time?

    3.  What incentives could be in place to encourage countries to be more environmentally friendly?

    4.  How will the UN be able to address each issue being different locally such as in Boston? (Boston flooding)

    Click here for background
  • Birmingham School Board: Critical Race Theory

    Birmingham School Board: Critical Race Theory
    (Advanced ability)

    As of August 12, 2021 the Alabama Board of Education has banned Critical Race Theory (CRT) from being taught. The Resolution titled, “The preservation of intellectual freedom and non-discrimination in Alabama’s public schools” which bans, “concepts that impute fault, blame, a tendency to oppress others, or the need to feel guilt or anguish to persons solely because of their race or sex.” This resolution restricts educators from teaching topics regarding systemic racism including CRT. CRT is defined by the NAACP as, “an academic and legal framework that denotes that systemic racism is part of American society — from education and housing to employment and healthcare.” Protests throughout Alabama including Birmingham have erupted in response to this resolution. The Birmingham school committee must decide if they will take action, and what kind of action is most appropriate.

    Questions to consider:
    1.  Are people of color (POC) students negatively impacted by learning about the oppression towards POC and systemic racism?

    2.  Are teachers qualified to teach topics about race regarding the oppression of POC and systemic racism? Is the solution more training?

    3.  Should anti-racism be taught in Birmingham schools instead of Critical Race Theory?

    Click here for background
  • FDR Cabinet: The New Deal March 5, 1933 - 1934

    FDR Cabinet: The New Deal March 5, 1933 – 1934
    (Intermediate ability)

    The 1920s was a great decade for stock market investors. Strengthened by military expenditures during the Great War, the US economy expanded forty-two percent. However, investors began borrowing money to buy stocks and shares, whose value lay in the trust Americans had for the economy. As people’s debts grew, doubt grew over the reliability of the stock market. In 1929, Wall Street crashed as a result of sixteen million shares being sold in the NYSE. It is now 1933, and the economy is in shambles with unemployment and poverty at unprecedented levels.

    1.  How can the U.S. government solve runs on banks, create confidence in the banking system?

    2.  How can the U.S. government improve domestic and foreign commerce?

    3.  Should there be an expanded role or reduced role, of the U.S. government?

    Click here for background
  • Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC)

    Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC)
    Chinese Economic Reform, National Committee, 1978
    (Intermediate ability)

    After the death of Mao Zedong and the arrest of the Gang of Four in 1976, the Cultural Revolution came to an end. In the aftermath, there were many views on where China should go next. More conservative members of the Communist Party of China believed that China should continue as a communist state, whereas reformists such as Deng Xiaoping supported a free market and privatization of certain industries.

    Questions to Consider:
    1. Should China stay true to its communist ideals, or privatize certain industries?

    2. What is the role of the government in a Chinese free market?

    Click here for background
  • FIFA World Cup 2022 in Qatar

    FIFA World Cup 2022 in Qatar
    (Intermediate ability)

    The goal will be to decide whether FIFA will address concretely Criticism from a number of media outlets, sporting experts, and human rights groups highlighted problems such as Qatar’s limited football history, the high expected cost, the local climate, and Qatar’s human rights record. There have been numerous allegations of bribery between the Qatar bid committee and FIFA members and executives.

    Questions to consider:
    1. Should the head of FIFA be replaced?

    2. Should Qatar be disqualified as a location for 2022 and replaced by another city?

    Click here for background
  • Warring Summit: Sengoku Period

    Warring Summit: Sengoku Period
    (Advanced ability)

    From 1467 CE to 1615 CE, Japan was in a state of constant civil war. This became known as the Sengoku Period. Due to the collapse in Japan’s feudal system, a power-vacuum emerged. Seeing the Samurai warlords and various clans compete for control caused political, economic, and social tumult. After over a century of fighting, power was gained by Oda Nobunaga, Toyotomi Hideyoshi, and Tokugawa Leyasu, and the feudal system was restored.

    Questions:
    1. Should the wars continue between these clashing groups?

    2. Should imperial authority be restored?

    3. Should power be centralized or decentralized?

    Click here for background
  • Security Council: Afghanistan

    Security Council: Afghanistan
    (Advanced ability)

    Over the past 50 years, Afghanistan has been an area where there is constant conflict and foreign occupation. Since the Soviet Union invasion in 1979 and the American occupation in 2002, Afghanistan has been a war-torn region. Following the withdrawal by the United States government in August 2021, the Taliban controls this nation. It is uncertain if the Taliban will protect the rights of women and children. The Security Council must weigh the benefits and drawbacks of foreign intervention and figure out how to protect the human rights of all Afghanistanis.

    1. Is it possible to balance foreign intervention with the protection of human rights of the Afghani people today?

    2. Should a United Nations peacekeeping presence be brought into Afghanistan?

    3. Should the Taliban remain in power? Should military action be taken?

    Click here for background
  • Joint Crisis Committee: Metacom's War 1675

    Joint Crisis Committee: Metacom’s War 1675
    (Advanced ability)

    The English are impatient for land expansion. The Native Americans are becoming increasingly dependent on English goods. Metacom’s older brother, Wamsutta, has suspiciously died from “illness” after being arrested for war conspiracy by the English; Natives believe he was poisoned and are eager for justice. Metacom comes to power in 1662 and the colonists believe he is plotting revenge. Tensions are rising on both sides, and Native and English leaders are fully prepared for war.

    NOTE: This committee is a joint crisis committee. This means there will be one topic with two separate committees. One room will contain Native American representation and the other will contain English representation.

    Native American side:
    1. How should you respond to the death of Wamsutta?

    2. Can Native American tribes maintain their sovereignty?

    3. Is it possible to negotiate a treaty with the English, or certain colonies?

    British side:
    1. How do you achieve your goal of political expansion peacefully? Is expansion necessary in English interests?

    2. How do you respond to the Native’s accusation that Wamsutta was poisoned?

    3. How do you respond to the conspiracies that Natives are plotting war?

    Click here for background on English Side Click here for background on Native American side
  • Emergency Summit: Crisis in the Suez

    Emergency Summit: Crisis in the Suez
    (Intermediate ability)

    After taking control of the Suez Canal from French influence in 1956, Egypt attempted to remain neutral in the ongoing political tension of the Cold War. Seeking economic growth, Egypt nationalized the canal which angered France and Britain. Both nations plotted to seize control of the canal with help from Israel. After hearing the plan, the US and USSR become irate.

    Questions:
    1. What can France and Britain do to ease tensions while keeping their foreign policy?

    2. How will the USSR respond to this act of NATO affiliated nations?

    3. Should Egypt no longer remain politically neutral?

    Click here for background
  • Illegal Poaching (GA) Middle School

    Illegal Poaching (GA) Middle School
    (All levels of experience welcome)

    Despite the international trade ban of Ivory in 1990, nearly 30,000 African elephants are killed by poachers yearly, out of a mere 400,000 continent-wide population. In the past century, 90% of all African elephants have been poached, primarily from their costly ivory tusks. These African elephants are more largely regarded for their enlarged ears and elongated tusks. Botswana, the home to nearly 130,000 of these African elephants, is reported to have given 70 elephant-hunting licenses in 2020, with plans for more in the future. This illegal trafficking of elephants hurts local elephant-led ecosystems and especially communities in Botswana that rely on tourism through the zoo industry. In this committee, delegates must determine how this poaching will be regulated or terminated, and how much power the UN has in restricting this matter. They can accomplish this by creating laws, secured habitats, or enacting strict punishments regarding the trade of ivory.

    Questions to consider:
    1. What action must and can be taken to hold countries or organizations responsible for these malicious actions?

    2. How can the UN assist governments in their regulations of the current ivory trade?

    3. What foreign policies could be enacted to resolve tensions and improve relations between these organizations and their home countries? What will make these organizations listen?

    4. How can the UN enforce illegal poaching in this region? Will local governments abide by these regulations, or secretly continue their licenses for a future profit?

    Click here for background

Awards


The Ben Maher’11 Best Position Paper Award:
Ben Maher was a two-time BC High Model UN Secretary General. He continued his Model UN work in college at Georgetown University. He had and continues to have now, a great love of writing including his work as a journalist with incredible interviews with the Occupy Wall Street protestors in Washington, DC. It is why we named this award after Ben.

A one to two page position paper is required for all participating delegates at the conference. We require this to focus everyone’s attention on the committee topics ahead of time. We have found that preparing these promotes more thoughtful discussion. Do not let this requirement impede your decision to attend this conference. We are only trying to make the discussion better. Delegates have two choices:

1. Submit the paper one week early to be considered for the Benjamin Maher’11 Best Paper Award, on March 1 2022 by emailing the paper to the appropriate BC High Committee Chair. These papers must be properly cited using the MLA format.
OR
2. Bring a hard copy with them to the conference on March 5, 2022. Each BC High. The Committee Chair is happy to help you with the paper. His school email address can be found on the cover page of the background guide.

The Chris Gidopoulos’95 People’s Choice Award
We thank Catholic Memorial High School and Mr. Vin Bradley for creating the idea for this award. We name this award after Chris Gidopoulos’95. Chris was an amazing, award winning Model UN delegate. He continued Model UN at Harvard University. When he passed away unexpectedly in 2013, BC High Model UNdecided to name the People’s Choice Award in Chris’ honor.

The Austin Martin’95 Distinguished Delegate Award Given in committee. Austin was a BC High Secretary General who wrote our club’s constitution. He was known as Mr. Model UN. He is currently a global stock analyst who works in the international business world.

History

Founded in 1986, the BC High Model United Nations Club gives students the experience of diplomacy and learning about international issues. The BC High Model United Nations Club engages in an authentic simulation of the United Nations system by learning about the UN system, the skills of debate, compromise, conflict resolution and negotiation. MUN team members have fun learning about the workings of world diplomacy through the lens of current events.

Currently our club has 250 members. Students participation choose their participation levels. There are weekly Wednesday meetings, weekend conferences, or overnight conferences. Some students attend everything while others participate when they are able.

BC High is proud to participate in conferences around the United States. Listed are a sample of the exciting opportunities our students have been a part of:

  • St. John’s High School – Shrewsbury Model UN (October)
  • Stanford University Model UN–Palo Alto, CA (November)
  • College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (November)
  • Vanderbilt University Model UN
  • Catholic Memorial High School Model UN (November)
  • New York City Visit to the United Nations—tour and interview of a mission rep
  • St. John’s Prep–– Danvers Model UN (December)
  • Seekonk High School (January)
  • Yale University Model UN (January)
  • North American Invitational Model UN at
  • Georgetown University (February)
  • University of Chicago Model UN
  • Duke University
  • University of Georgia
  • Georgetown University (February)
  • Sandwich High Model UN (April)

We are grateful to have hosted some remarkable speakers over the last several years.

  • Diego Aria, President of the UN Security Council
  • Quanuquanei Karmue, Executive Director & Co-Founder at Save More Kids
  • Hon. A. Paul Celluci, US Ambassador to Canada and former Massachusetts Governor
  • Rick Walsh’02 Special Assistant to the Undersecretary of State, US State Department
  • Dermott Groome, Chief Prosecutor, The Hague, Netherlands
  • Congressman Michael Capuano (D-MA)
  • John Bird, CIA Analyst Cuban Missile Crisis
  • Sheryl & Matt from Boston Homeless Shelter
  • Jared Owen Massachusetts Recovery Center for Addiction
Model UN Conference at Stanford University
Model UN Conference at Seekonk High School

Registration & Schedule

BC High Model UN 30
BC High MODEL UN Conference 30 SATURDAY MARCH 5, 2022 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Cost per delegate: $39. There are no delegation or moderator fees.

Only an adult moderator affiliated with your school may register. All delegates must be accompanied by a school approved adult. No student may register their school nor attend the conference without an adult. An email registration and a promise to pay the delegate fees is required. Once received, we will send you a request for your committee and country preferences.

It is better to underestimate your delegation total than overestimate it.

A $100 deposit is due by January 20, 2022. Make a credit card payment or a check payable to BC High., 150 Morrissey Blvd, Boston, MA 02125.

The $100 deposit reduces the total balance due for each school. For example: 10 delegates x $39 =$390. Subtract the $100 deposit, $390-$100= $290 balance due.

BC High Model UN Conference 30 is an in-person conference. All participants must be vaccinated for Covid-19. Moderators will submit a verification form stating all delegates and moderators are vaccinated by February 17, 2022.

Important Dates
Jan. 21, 2022:

Registration and $100 deposit, checks made payable to BC High. Tell us your committee and country preferences as well as the number delegates that you anticipate attending. It is better to underestimate than overestimate your delegate totals.

Alexander Church ’22, Director of External Affairs, will advise you about invoices and billing.
[email protected]

Feb. 10, 2022:
Delegates totals are fixed on this day. After this date, schools are financially responsible for the reserved delegate total. Final payments are due. Background guides and country assignments posted. Conference Chair Christopher Kerwin ’22 sends moderators committee assignments.
[email protected]

Feb. 17, 2021
Final payment is due to BC High. Vaccination Statement Form is due to BC High.